Author Archives: pthestudp

End of Summer Albums 2010

Summer’s almost over.  But that makes this even more pertinent.  And it’s not like the value of these great albums will diminish in the first few days of fall—although we may have to do another one for autumn.  We decided to do this after Android50’s Best Summer Albums of 2010. Not that we hated the list or the music of 2010.  Our input just wasn’t asked for, like Android50 had some sort of monopoly on summer tunes.  So here is our list, no restrictions, just albums we have been listening to this summer.  Looking through it, it gets me all excited, as it just might turn some on to some new tunes.  As for me, Kid Kilowatt took my Jawbox (I love Novelty), but besides that Iggy Pop’s first two solo albums (Lust for Life & the Idiot) are great to bike around to and have been in heavy rotation, Yo La Tengo have made a huge comeback (I Can Hear the Heart Beating as One) would be perfect for this time of year and autumn, but it was played constantly this summer as well.  I got hooked on Will Oldham’s Palace incarnations, especially Viva Last Blues and Sleater-Kinney (especially One Beat & All Hands on the Bad One)  once again—it had been a while.  Oxbow, Beach House (an obvious pick), Smog, Destroyer (City of Daughters is soooooo good), Dinosaur Jr.’s Beyond, Guided by Voices, High on Fire, Modest Mouse (I think I have Songssuck to blame for this one, as he made me revisit Moon & Antarctica due to the 2000 list), My Morning Jacket (their first three, don’t talk to me about them after that), Neurosis, Mastodon, and the Woods made up the majority of my playlists this summer.

Of course the start of the summer saw me listening to nothing but Isis, Dio and Black Sabbath.  It was a sad time for a while.  But I said goodbye to Dio and Isis in my own way, but that doesn’t mean I don’t still miss them.  Lots of stuff to check and revisit (for some reason the 90s were in VERY heavy rotation this summer, hum), enjoy what’s left of the nice weather with these great picks!

Emitt Rhodes

s/t
(ABC/Dunhill Records: 1970)

8.6

Being a big Paul McCartney fan I was hesitant to try Pthestudp’s recommendation of this album. I started to hear about it in other places, and Pthestudp insisted we listen to it.  Forgive me, I should have proponent of Emitt long ago.  The McCartney comparison is unavoidable, as even his voice sounds like Sir McCartneys.  But unlike Paul’s work with Wings, these songs never veer towards overkill and are brilliant.  His four solo albums have been re-released, but it was his self-titled debut that one HAS to have in their collection.  Perfect summer listening.  – Suzy Creamcheese

Unwound

Fake Train/New Plastic Ideas/The Future of What/Repetition/ Challenge for a Civilized Society/Leaves Turn Inside You
(Kill Rock Stars: 1993/94/95/96/98/01)

Really I could have picked any Unwound album (and I did).  They are all fantastic.  Start with the beginning, (93’s Fake Train) if you wish.  I have always told people Unwound are Sonic Youth plus Fugazi.  And I don’t fucken lie about shit like that.  So fucking underrated it pisses me off. – Songssuck


Gandalf

s/t

(Capitol Records: 1969)

8.4

Psychedelic, poppy, spooky—this one, in a sea of lost 60’s artifacts, stands out as being legit. No hype here, these guys have it.  I dig it out every summer and it is a required listen on summer road trips, with no one I have played it for not being enchanted and won over. – Willie Rambo Strider


Fennesz

Endless Summer

(Mego: 2001)

9.1

I play this album over and over again.  Guitars processed & distorted beyond recognition.  The sounds come from summer, but not summer on this planet.  Summer in a much better time and place. Summer somewhere, when it rains, it rains drops of warm sunshine.  Though maybe, this place is just a summery state of mind. – Tyrannosaurus Banks

Leo Cuypers

Heavy Days Are Here Again

(BVHaast: 1981)

AK-47

I wanted to highlight this one during our ‘Best of 2000’ list, but Songssuck said absolutely no reissues.  So here we are, with an unheard of classic from 1981.  Have you ever seen those ‘Live, Laugh, Love’ posters/decorations?  Well, those schmucks should just hang this LP on their wall instead, because this album is just bursting at the seams with the exuberant energy from those three entities.  Pthestudp described it as Schroeder’s soundtrack to Charlie Brown losing his virginity on a roller coaster to Lucy.  Fuck yah! –Tyrannosaurus Banks

Band of Horses

Cease to Begin
(Sub Pop: 2007)

8.5

I did me some listening to the Band of Horses this summer.  Reminds me a bit of old My Morning Jacket, lots of grandiosity, lots of reverb, guitars making the night sky seem small.  Pretty great.  –Dr. Anonymous

Borbetomagus

Barbed Wire Maggots
(Agaric: 1982)

AK-47

Fierce.  Free.  Uncompromising.  Because something has to be.  The problem is most people go into this album looking for jazz.  This ain’t jazz.  It’s the sound of a herd of wild stallions that have never seen a harness.  And the fuck if these ones ever will. –Kid Kilowatt

Cold Sun

Dark Shadows
(World in Sound: 1973)

Deserves its Holy Grail status.

Roky Erickson fronting Pavement.  Captain Beefheart jamming with the Grateful Dead.  Good shit. – Ho Chi Unser Jr.

Jawbox

Novelty/For Your Own Special Sweetheart
(Dischord Records: 1992/Atlantic: 1994)

These are classics, one cannot rate a classic.

For these two, Jawbox may have become mightier than their labelmates, Fugazi.  Some songs on these two remind me of The Jesus Lizard, but Jawbox were always Big Blackier then Minor Threaty.  I like Novelty better than their major label debut (I know, I know, probably wouldn’t have been possible without major label money, but I would like to hear it with more balls), but both are essential 90s documents.  Make sure you take them both with you when rock climbing.  –Kid Kilowatt

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Mastodon “Crack the Skye”

Mastodon
Crack the Skye
(Reprise: 2009)

8.5

I confess: Mastodon had lost me.  I mean, those dudes were wanking themselves completely off their fucken rockers.  The first thing that turned me off was all these dooshes started loving them (bound to happen when a band hits the big time, and I am stupid for holding that against them).  But then my buddy told me how he saw them live and they all had like 30 guitars and roadies tuning them (and doing everything else) for the band (huge turnoff for a DIY kinda guy).  The big deal breaker was reading that James Hetfield came up to Mastodon guitarist Brett Hinds, telling him he wanted to “pass the metal torch on to you guys.”  James, you pretentious fuck.  First off, there is no torch that goes to the best metal band passed on by the last best metal band.  And if there were a said torch, Metallica would not have had it in its possession for at least twenty years.  Mastodon acting like that was a compliment pissed me off.

Then I heard about the new LP: a concept album about some paraplegic who flies too close to the sun, causing him to go through a wormhole where his spirit goes into Rasputin’s body to warn him of his planned assassination.  Okay… I could handle Remission’s theme of nuclear holocaust and the drummer’s dream of the burning horses, Leviathan’s “Moby Dick” bent, even Blood Mountain’s stories of climbing mountains only to find blood thirsty ogres (and more challenges) at the top.  But this was way too much, if I wanted such progtastic themed wanky meanderings I have plenty of Magma, Yes or Genesis albums to put the needle to (in fact, the theme almost sounded like a rip off of The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway).  After a couple of quick listens to parts of the album, I realized I didn’t need it from my once favorite metal-core band (I even heard keyboards!).  AND TO TOP IT OFF: gone were the throaty primal grunt growl scream vocals of past albums.  The boys were now singing, even harmonizing with each other (obviously, I thought, this was what happens when the band brought Brendan O’Brien, who’s done work for Pearljam and Springsteen, in to produce).  My NU-Metal radar was going off like crazy, and I could see that Mastodon were going the way of the heroes, Metallica, and were no longer relevant but completely over-dooshified.

So, last week I almost didn’t go see Mastodon even though they were playing like 5 minutes from my apartment (in fact if Baroness would not have been on the bill I probably wouldn’t have gone).  Would that ever have been a mistake: the boys are so fucken technically and the songs from Crack the Skye so compositionally sick that the show was altogether mind blowing.  After about twenty minutes of them playing Crack the Skye track by track, I forgave them for everything (even the somewhat harmonious vocals).  I began to see it: Brett Hinds’ confined hospital stay led to the astral traveling theme of the album (kind of like a Brian Eno or Robert Wyatt story).  I imagined him in a hospital bed, his only mode of travel psychic (I may be pushing this way too far, but it’s probably appropriate for such a far out album).

Crack the Skye’s seven songs clock in at just over 50 minutes, but I am lost in the maze, never do I check to see how much time is left. The proggy/jazzy time signatures (For the RIYL guys, it’s like King Crimson attempting to be Iron Maiden) have me changing my headbanging routine like every thirty seconds and the riffs crescendo and fall like the Andes Mountains.   Mastodon can be as indulgent and poppy as they want, as long as the riffs keep my fist pumping and my world turned upside down, which they are able to do for most of the album.  Although, I do find myself at times wishing for the harder hitting, death metal screaming band of yore, this is a more than welcome reprise.  And 50 minutes for me to contemplate on what conceptual them the guys will think of next.

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Top 100 Albums of 2000 (80-61)

80.  OOIOO – Gold and Green

Yoshimi P-We (of the Boredoms) drops much of the grating no wave and goes for melody and atmosphere (kind of like her main band’s album from the same year in fact).  – Willie Rambo Strider

79.  Broadcast – The Noise Made by People

I have always heard Stereolab too much in Broadcast’s music to get too into it.  Which isn’t fair to them, cos it is pretty darn good electronic Euro-pop made for old spy movies.  Contains some fantastic songs and would rank much higher if I could ever get over how much it sounds like a Stereolab rip-off.  — Songssuck

78. White Stripes – De Stijl

I hadn’t listened to this in at least 5 years.  It just never made me as hard as everyone else.  But I am glad I dug it out, I was surprised by how much I enjoyed it.  Pretty diverse set of songs for a rock duo.  If you liked Elephant pick this up, I always thought this was a better album.  – Ho Chi Unser Jr.

77. Boris – Flood

Like Absolutego, this album is one long track (I know that turned a few off already).  Boris at their most minimalist and serene.  Jimi Hendrix joining a krautrock band and trying to seduce a woman by sending gentle ocean guitar waves her way would sound like this.  But at times one feels as if the waves are a flood of heaviness, albeit not heaviness from loudness, riffs or death metal vocals.  Leave it to Boris to be so good they can be heavy without being heavy.  — Pthestudp

76. Deftones – White Pony*

Deftones: here to show us that rap + metal or nu-metal wasn’t such a bad idea after all.  — Pthestudp

75. Super Furry Animals – Mwng

A largely acoustic offering, void of the electronic studio wizardry and harder rocking songs and sung entirely in Welsh.  Interestingly enough, as this was my first SFAs, I thought they were all like this.  And that’s not a bad thing, even though their organic arrangements and acoustic instrumentation don’t allow the band to really flesh the songs out like on other SFA albums.  I guess the band didn’t put too much time or money into the album (this along with the other aforementioned differences made some critics and fans dismiss this album as a stunt), but that doesn’t keep it from being a really great pop album that you will sing along with, even if it is in Welsh (actually the language barrier for me makes this album more otherworldly and lush and just plain better, I can’t really explain it.  It is just a beautiful language).  Get a version with the 5 bonus tracks, they are good.  – Dr. Anonymous

74. Wu-Tang Clan – The W

Depending on what day it is, I like this even better than Supreme Clientele (although not most days). It makes me sad when I talk to people about 36 Chambers and they haven’t heard this one.  – Dr. Anonymous

73.  Primal Scream – XTRMNTR

Bobby Gillespie recruits Mani (from the Stone Roses, which was an excellent choice, as some of the basslines are just incredible) and Kevin Shields (of My Bloody Valentine) and an army of robot insects for his percussion section.  The first two songs on the album, “Kill All Hippies” and “Accelerator” vie for the top songs of 2000.  But one cannot start off an album so strong and expect people not to be disappointed as it goes along.  If this list was the best two songs to start off an album, XTRMNTR would win hands down.  – Kid Kilowatt

72.  Mirah – You Think It’s Like This But Really It’s Like This*

I’ve read a lot of myths about Mirah.  That she makes nut milk and sells it at the café she runs out of her apartment, that she was born on her parents’ kitchen table, that her full name is Mirah Yom Tov Zeitlyn, and that she is a gay Jewish hobo hippie.  Who knows which, if any, are true.  Her debut album has been called “brutally cloying” and a “charmer.”  Honestly, I find both to be true depending on one’s mood and which of the 16 songs one is listening to.  The discerning folks at aQ records point out that Mirah could have just as easily done the soundtrack to Juno.  That goes a long way towards describing her music, but it is nowhere as apt of a description as on YTILTBRILT.  You can literally hear some of the songs on the movie, they are honest, endearing and heart wrenching.  Phil Elverum of the Microphones (which Mirah was also a member of) lends his production and instrumental skills to the album, and his presence is palpable.  – Suzy Creamcheese

71.  Arab on the Radar – Soak the Saddle

Yoko Ono fronting the teenage noise punk band next door.  Obviously, for some, or in certain moods this album will be too abrasive/annoying.  But I cannot say ‘No’ to the guitars (although Pitchfork can, they gave it a ‘2.0’). – Songssuck

70.  Marumari – The Wolves Hollow

Supposedly, this album tells the story of a wolf race from outer space.  The wolfemian fed cow brains to a supercomputer in order to survive.  But on April 18th, 1976, the war of the worlds began when earth wolves attacked the wolfemian.  Before the alien wolves were all destroyed, thy passed their music onto Josh Presseisen, who had contacted the wolfemian some years earlier on ham radio.  This all sounds really lame and ridiculous, until one has listened to the album about 3 times.  The Wolves Hollow rewards repeated listens and the otherworldliness of the music begins to shine through.  Then one realizes it could only have come from alien wolves.  – Kid Kilowatt

69.  Iron Maiden – Brave New World

Bruce Dickinson and Adrian Smith return to Maiden thus reuniting the classic lineup (along with 3rd guitarist Janick Gers) for the first time since 1990’s No Prayer for the Dying (I think, it might have even been 88’s Somewhere in Time).  Maiden sound rejuvenated and ready to kick ass again.  Seriously, if you like Maiden you owe it to yourself to pick this one up.  Not as good as their first five albums, but up there.  Brought down a bit by Harris’ overt progginess that doesn’t work at times, but how many 80’s metal bands still kicked this much ass in 2000?  None.  — Pthestudp

68.  Sacred Steel – Bloodlust

Ever been sad after thinking about the lack of classic metal being produced these days?  Well dry your tears heavy metal warriors.  Sacred Steel are here with 11 songs that sound like it is 1983.  – Pthestudp

67.  Swearing at Motorists – Number Seven Uptown

Dave Doughman and Don Thrasher (dude who drummed for GBV during their especially kick ass period) create some Guided By Voices influenced ditties about coming home for Christmas, vans, wondering where you went wrong, and seeing an ex girlfriend walking down the street.  I love their lo-fi harmonies.  An underrated album from a very unheard band.  – Kid Kilowatt

66. The For Carnation – s/t

Nick Mirov, who writes for the website the Bay Bridged had this to say: “This album is the sonic equivalent of standing on a deserted dock at midnight and watching fog roll towards you with a nagging feeling in your gut that some evil presence is near.”  I bought this album because of its connections with Slint and Tortoise (Brian Mc and Britt Walford from Slint and John McEntire from Tortoise).  Don’t be surprised if you are disappointed if you come to this album for the wrong reasons (it really isn’t much like Slint or Tortoise), as I was for a long time. – Songssuck

65. Boss Hog – Whiteout

Some swampy blues, with a lot of electronics thrown in for extra kicks, from Christina Martinez and her husband Jon Spencer.  Judge this book by its cover cos the music, like the cover is good shit.  – Willie Rambo Strider

64.  Propagandhi – Today’s Empires, Tomorrow’s Ashes*

John K. Samson left to form Weakerthans and took a lot of the melody & humor along with him.  Propagandhi were much more hardcore and pissed off on this album, “with friends like these, who the fuck needs Cointelpro?”  Definitely worth buying the actual album, a lot of info that blew my mind back then included.  Appropriate that it was one in the bunch that my mother threw away, that’s for sure (although I would like to think that Patti stands against “bullshit politicians,” the exploitation of workers in 3rd World countries, terrorism, and “ordinary people do[ing] fucked-up things when fucked-up things become ordinary.”)  She just really hates hardcore.  Don’t we all.  – Pthestudp

63.  Radiohead – Kid A*

I know I know.  You are tired of hearing/reading about Radiohead and Kid A. But you know what’s crazy?  There are some people who don’t listen to Radiohead.  Dumbasses.  I hadn’t listened to this in like 5 years (Who’s guiltier?).  But seriously, that kind of proves my point: it is overrated.  It has become more of an idea than an album (like a holy grail everyone just looks at and no one drinks from), topping everyone’s best of the 00’s lists.  A good (but not the best from the last 10 years) album that needs to be listened to and not talked about.  So I’ll shut up now.  – Dr. Anonymous

62.  Jackie-O Motherfucker – Fig. 5

Deep in the Psychedelic Forest live a tribe of dwarves.  But these aren’t the type of dwarves you may have heard of.  These dwarves like to party, get fucked up and jam.  In fact these dwarves’ drum circles are so groovy that Albert Ayler sometimes stops by to sit in on the circle, drop some shrooms, drink some dwarf beer and deconstruct and revise folk classics to the point they become avant-garde masterpieces (in fact “Amazing Grace” is pretty much unrecognizable).  Can you dig it?  — Songssuck

61. The Panoply Academy Corps of Engineers – Concentus

If it were not for a album put out by Dischord, Concentus would hold the best math rock album of 2000 title.  Nar Nar Nar/ Nar Nar Nar Nar/ Heeeeeeeyyyyyyyyy! – Songssuck

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Top 100 Albums of 2000 (100-81)

Finally the countdown begins.  Get in touch with us if you want to know where to get ahold of the album legally.  Again, an asterisk next to the album’s title signifies Android50’s approval.  – Songssuck

2000: the year I really began paying attention to music not heard every day on the radio.  This should be fun.  – Ho Chi Unser Jr.


100.  Badly Drawn Boy – The Hour of the Bewilderbeast *

I checked out this album because of Damon Gough’s soundtrack to the movie, About A Boy. Whether you like this album as well as the music to that movie depends on your tolerance for eccentric self-indulgence and experimentally laced White Album length pop album. – Kid Kilowatt

99.  Death Cab for Cutie – We Have the Facts and We’re Voting Yes

The first band on this list I checked out because of Built to Spill comparisons.  Even though they are probably now the biggest/most popular of the Pacific Northwest bands, they have never gotten that many plays at my crib, they’re usually too mopey and depressing.  But this is their best album, it has some great songs and if you’re in the mood it hits the spot. – Songssuck

98.  Go-Betweens – The Friends of Rachel Worth

I’m not that cool, so this was the first Go-Betweens album I heard.  I had read about how great their 80’s output was, but had never dived in to find out for myself.  Actually, it was hearing that Elliot Smith, Sam Coomes and the ladies from Sleater-Kinney were the backing band that made me check it out.  I was at first disappointed as it was only on 3 songs I could tell S-K was involved, the riffs on “The Clock” and “German Farmhouse” were clearly S-K’s doing, and Corin Tucker sings on “Going Blind” even though she is so subdued one cannot tell it is her.  It was the Australian duo’s first album after disbanding in 1989, so it should have been a disaster, but these two clearly know their way around a pop song. — Pthestudp

97.  Burmese – Monkeys Tear Man to Shreds, Man Never Forgives Ape, Man Destroys Environment

Literally probably the aural equivalent of the album’s title.  Two basses, no guitar create some intense noise with lots of low end crushing with spastic drumming. – Dr. Anonymous

96.  Grandaddy – The Sophtware Slump *

I remember buying this album based solely on comparisons to the Flaming Lips and Radiohead.  I could never hear the Radiohead, but listening to it now it does remind me of the Lips a bit. – Kid Kilowatt

95. Eels – Daisies of the Galaxy *

The Eels’ Daisies of the Galaxy is an album you put on to lay back, chill and drink an ice cold beer.  This album has attitude, despite being the Eels’ softest album.  The attitude can be summed up with the chorus of the closing track: “Goddamn right, it’s a beautiful day.”  Mark E’s vocals and overall simplistic style make this album worthy of any music lover’s collection. Mondo Topless

94.  Mouse on Mars – Niun Niggung

Oftentimes when an artist releases an album that has a lighter, happier feel than their previous works, it is dismissed as a lesser or somehow trivial work.  (I’ve often said that Radiohead only need to release a “party” album to get horrible reviews).  For some reason, playful and fun albums are seldom considered as significant; when is the last time one heard one described as “timeless?”  So even though Niun Niggung probably isn’t as good as Iaora Tahiti or Idiology it is not because of its bouncy playfulness and it is worthy to sit along side them in the Mouse on Mars canon. – Suzy Cream Cheese

93.  Two Lone Swordsmen – Tiny Reminders

Small aide memoires?  More like bitch slaps to the face (delivered via fucked up electro, call it techno if you must). – Songssuck

92.  Sonic Youth – NYC Ghosts & Flowers

NYCG&F’s tribute to beat poetry, bohemian New York, and avant-garde noise was recorded shortly after all of Sonic Youth’s inimitable, custom-tweaked & tuned guitars were stolen.  Pretty much the redheaded stepchild of the SY discography (it was given an unwarranted ‘0.0” by Pitchfork). – Dr. Anonymous

91.  Idlewild – 100 Broken Windows *

Really these songs could be on any alternative/modern rock station.  But I keep coming back to it after all these years and I wasn’t even expecting to like this anymore when I listened to this again for this list.  But I did.  I’ve heard them compared to Nirvana and R.E.M. a lot, though I don’t hear it.  But something about it makes it impossible for me to describe so I’ll go with it.  It’s like Nickelback + Green Day with awesomer guitars and a better vocalists.  No one is going to want to hear it after that comparison. – Pthestudp

90.  Cave In – Jupiter

In high school all one had to say was “Slayer” to get my attention.3 So when I heard about this band who equaled an addition of Radiohead + Slayer (even though I am pretty sure all I knew about Radiohead was that “Creep” song) I had to check it out.  I fucken loved Until Your Heart Stops, and couldn’t wait for their next album.  What I got next was a shit sandwich: it was obvious to me that Jupiter was a full-scale sellout.  Soaring falsetto vocals, ornate poppy melodies fit for arenas, this shit was an obvious attempt to get on MTV (and I do believe I was right, after this they signed to a major label).  Revisiting it years later I began to like it, and now; 10 years later I can appreciate what they were trying to do (it’s called making money.  I cannot appreciate it as much as I appreciate their metal albums though). – Songssuck

89.  Zion I – Mind Over Matter

Old school loops and beats, but totally off kilter, smooth but hiccupping and rapid fire. But frankly, at 21 songs and almost 75 minutes this is a bit too much of a good thing, even if most of it is catchy and funky.  – Dr. Anonymous

88.  Damien Jurado – Ghost of David *

Sometime in 2003 I burnt Android50 a bunch of cd-rs.  He reviewed a lot of them.  Here is what he had to say about Ghost of David: “The first time I listened to this CD I almost cried… literally.  It was a rainy afternoon, had a rough day at school, and stuck this in on the way home.  Not bad… sniffle sniffle… pretty good stuff… sniffle sniffle… You’re SO right Damien!  His lyrics are great; they tell a story yet they still have that emotional edge that is sometimes lost in the narrative song.”  That’s Android50’s ’03 take and to that I would add, “it’s pretty folky and there are some really good songs.”  — Songssuck

87.  Giant Sand – Chore of Enchantment

Convertino and Burns of Calexico fame join Howe Gelb for his 10th or so album as Giant Sand.  The desert always attracts a certain type of person, and that explains where this music comes from.  It will be interesting to see where Songssuck ranks this one with Calexico’s offering from this year, but for my money I’ll take Chore of Enchantment. Add even more drugs to Neil Young’s more deserty albums or Meat Puppets’ II and one can begin to put their ears around this one.  Like tequila, an aquired taste. – Suzy Creamcheese

86.  Six Organs of Admittance – Dust and Chimes

Sunny and druggy, ragga influenced, vocal chants coming from some hallucinogenic otherworlderness.  John Fahey, Robbie Basho and early Tyrannosaurus Rex are all good reference points.  Ben Chasny is an amazing guitarist who also plays with Comets on Fire.  Should check it out if you are a fan of the acoustic guitar. – Willie Rambo Strider

85.  Ryan Adams – Heartbreaker*

Android50 and Suzy Creamcheese are the Ryan Adams fans of the BDWPS writers and the only Whiskeytown I own is a cd-r he gave me.  But I’d say this is his most country album and is overrated in my opinion.  Having said that, it has two of my all time favorite songs on it: “To Be Young (is to be sad, is to be high)” and “Come Pick Me Up.”  I could talk shit on Ryan all day long (and used to) but it would be worthless when he is capable of writing two songs like that (in fact that is why I picked up this album, after finding out that song on the movie Old School was on this album).  I listened to “Come Pick Me Up” four times in a row first time I listened to this album and once more after the record was spinning. – Dr. Anonymous

84.  Eternal Elysium – Spiritualized D

Japanese doom band carrying the torch of earlier Japanese heavy psych bands, like Flower Travellin’ Band, Blues Creation, Speed Glue & Shinki, and Flied Egg.  – Ho Chi Unser Jr.

83.  Yo La Tengo – And Then Nothing Turned Itself Inside-Out

Everyone who knows knows that YLT is one of my all time faves.  But I must say this album still throws me for a loop.  You see, this album is completely devoid (except for the excellent “Cherry Chapstick”) of distortion, noise and hard rocking anthems.  It is what I call their ‘wussy’ album.  I mean the songs are great, but they are all gentle lullabies.  We have heard songs like these before from these guys, but where is the diversity YLT are known for?  I realize that they were going for something else on this album, but it just doesn’t do it for me.  Still, a good album (and a critic’s favorite by the way), but I have a feeling it is one of the maybe three on this list my mother might like. – Songssuck

82.  Frogs – Racially Yours

Supposedly this album was finished in ’93, but no one would release it due to the controversial cover and lyrics.  If you are not familiar with the Frogs, they are two brothers from Milwaukee who had previously written It’s Only Right and Natural an album about being gay (by two straights).  Racially Yours is sung from different first person perspectives: a slave, a slave owner, a racist, a revolutionary minded black man, a slave trader, and other various characters.  The controversy over this album is overstated, it is an indictment of racism, anyone who cannot figure that out has their head way too far up their ass.  I understand if one thinks this album is too irreverent, offensive or absurd, but it is hard to actually listen and find it actually racist.  Whether this is insulting or thought provoking depends on one’s viewpoint.  The actual music is wonderful (although out of 25 songs there are some duds), real lo-fi, glammy, melodic, lush and fun.  The lyrics are not as funny as on past releases.  Pearl Jam, Kurt Cobain, Kim Deal, and The Smashing Pumpkins are all bands I remember championing them back in the day.  – Dr. Anonymous

81.  Boredoms – Vision Creation Newsun

How much you like this album will depend upon whether you like chaotic, spastic noise punk anthems Boredoms or cosmic hippie psychedelic trance Boredoms, Vision Creation Newsun being one of the latter.  Everyone choose sides. –Wille Rambo Strider

Boredoms?! Better than At the Drive-In “Relationship of Command”!? What a disgrace. – Android50


3 Some things never change.

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Megadeth “Rust in Peace”

Megadeth
“Rust in Peace”
(Capitol Records)

Although I wasn’t old enough to realize it at the time, the 80’s were an oasis, an everlasting cultural paradise. Album after album of classic rip roaring metal coming out, seemingly on a daily basis. Bands that were okay in the 70’s became unstoppable monoliths in the 80’s; promising 70’s metal bands fulfilled their potential and then some. Even bands thought DOA by the end of the 70’s were given new life by the fertile atmosphere of ensuing decade.

All bands had to do was grow their hair long and wear leather in order to release a classic album. Was their something in the water? Was it do with some clandestine CIA operation? Did Reagan know or have anything to do with it? Whatever it was, it worked; the 80’s were and will always remain metal’s peak.

Of course, all the great metal got God, Jesus and the Holy Ghost’s attention. Satan had ruled the 80’s and they could not let it happen again. So on December 31, 1989, they set up a wall of angels in order to shield the people of earth from metal. Every would-be classic metal album was seen coming way ahead of time by the winged sentinels and crushed by the mighty angels. No high quality metal could penetrate this wall, the angels were there to fuck metal’s shit up and that is exactly what they did. Jesus had instructed the Satan pounding angels to especially look out for thrash metal albums. He was worried that the genre was getting too big and that the unholy thrash coming from bands like Exodus, Slayer, Metallica, Anthrax, Testament, and Kreator was becoming too much of an influence on potential converts. Plus, the Holy Trinity had decided nothing that technically and compositionally sick could be made without some assistance from Satan. “Their axe wielding and song writing skills, along with their sacrilegious and irreverent lyrics clearly have Satan’s fingerprints all over them,” the Holy Ghost was overheard telling Jesus. “No decent thrash may pass” became a slogan of the holy haloed warriors.

And the 90’s would have stayed a thrash free zone if it were not for a man named Dave Mustaine. Mustaine was the leader of a band called Megadeth whose second album, Peace Sells… But Who’s Buying, had particularly pissed Jesus off, cos everyone knows that Jesus owns the biggest peace dealership in the galaxy. But the Trinity were not too worried about Megadeth, as their third album, 1988’s So Far, So Good… So What!, was loaded with filler and 1990 had found Mustaine in a drug rehab facility. Thus, Megadeth was not on the Ass Rapers of All Things Satanic (ARATS)’s watch list. But obviously, this was all part of Satan’s plan. It was Satan that had seen to it that Mustaine suffered from writer’s block during the making of the third album, and it was Satan that convinced Mustaine to fire the guitarist Chris Poland after Peace Sells and replace him with a far less talented axe wielder. Satan knew if he could just get one good thrash album through into the 90’s it would open the floodgates. (His first plan involved Metallica, but they were high up on ARAT’s watchlist and the white army had already made sure they were reduced to whiny babies and pussy sell outs who loved money more than making good music, so Satan hatched another plan). And Mustaine was his chosen man. Mustaine kicked the heroin habit, found a badass second guitarist in Marty Friedman, wrote & recorded nine killer songs in less than a year; all while flying low enough under the radar to sneak up and find a crack in the angels’ wall (now seriously think about it, could that be done without Satan’s help?).

The angels in heaven still to this day kick themselves in the ass for letting Rust in Peace through, cos what an album it is. Not only is it Megadeth’s best album, it is one of the best thrash albums of all time. There is absolutely no filler and every song has some badassed guitar duels between Mustaine and Friedman. These aren’t even songs, they are thrash suites executed with awesome skill. This is one technical mother fucker, with riffs to die for. And for those who say Mustaine’s voice sucks (of which I am not one), should just drown out his voice by singing along with these politically and socially aware anthems. “Brother will kill brother/Spilling blood across the land/Killing for religion/Something I don’t understand.” Or my personal favorite to sing along to: “Take no prisoners, take no shit!” But seriously, “Poison Was the Cure” has the best anti-drug lyrics ever put to music.

This album is seriously underrated, it is a classic that should be in every metal, nay, music lovers library. And it should be heralded for the fact that it was the album that put a crack in the thrash hating angels’ wall, (although the crack was only there for two weeks, just long enough for Slayer to get Seasons in the Abyss through, after which it was discovered and sealed shut. Another decent thrash album was not let through until the 00’s, when the angels realized that listening to metal did not make one murder others or sacrifice goats) but it is hardly ever recognized as such, mostly due to ignorance. (and Jesus’ successful campaign to turn everyone’s attention to Metallica’s Black Album as it obviously sucked and lacked the power of Satan). So we here at BDWPS do what should have been done almost 20 years ago, proclaim it a masterpiece and bestow upon it its deserved status of being an all time Classic album.

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One Hundred Dollars “Forest of Tears”

One Hundred Dollars
Forest of Tears
(Blue Fog: 2008)

Rating: 8.6

I have a friend who is constantly bitching to me that, “there is no good punk rock these days.”  Obviously, this friend is a big incorrect doosh, cos there is.  I always get pissed at those types of dudes.  Every genre has its ups and downs, but to say that a genre, any genre, is void of good music here in the late 00’s is erroneous. 

Having said all that, what a pile of shit country music is these days.  Fucken horrible shit.  I sit here watching the CMA’s (I know, I know, what the fuck am I doing watching that?) and it is just one big BLAND piece of shit coming on stage after another.  Boring songs, boring lyrics, boring people, it makes me want to puke.  Also, are there any country artists who aren’t ridiculously good looking?  I mean, I have nothing against good looking people (god knows I am one of them) but are you telling me that every country artist with talent looks like a model?  I seriously hope that some of these people I see on TV get the swine flu.  Think I am being too harsh on mainstream country music?  Then go fuck yourself, you dooshface.

Thank god there are still some fuckers out there, who know that country music is more than wearing a cowboy hat in public, singing about being ridiculously patriotic or looking good while singing shitty pop songs written by someone else (here’s to you Taylor Swift, cos while Kanye is a “jackass” he was right about one thing, your song & video does suck donkey dick, even if you did write it yourself as some who have stuck up for you  against my tirades have claimed).  I am talking about $100 and Forest of Tears, the best country album of the last year or so that I can think of right now (I am in emergency mode after seeing 3 minutes of the CMAs, if I think of a better one I’ll have to clue y’all in later).

Lots of songs about hardships, trains, lesbians on the run, minimum wage, using manure for fertilizer and drinking sung by my new favorite female country singer and embellished with plenty of pedal steel.  I’ll tell you what, it is a pleasure to have this album with me when I need some company (like the drive from Boise to Omaha, in one of them big assed Penske moving trucks).  But mostly I guess it is just good to know that good country music isn’t just a thing of the past.

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Cheap Time “self-titled”

Cheap Time
s/t
(In the Red: 2008)

 8.1

I had skipped over this one, as I had heard it described as “new wave” one too many times.  I am many things, but I cannot count among them ‘a man with a hard on for lots of new wave albums’.  So I felt pretty safe leaving this one on the racks unheard and unloved.  But In the Red Records have been on such a role lately, and I spotted it in the used rack at my local record store.  So I thought to myself, “hum, I might pick that up.”  Then, “where you coming from now?  You hate new wave.”  Then, “but it’s only 4 dollars.”  And on and on, with the end result it being in the CD player later that day, obviously. 

 But this ain’t your mama’s favorite new wave band.  I can see why everyone insists on calling it that, but this is new wave with BALLS.  Big hairy balls, balls that have balls of their own.  (So let’s see, you have two gigantic balls, each of which has two balls of its own.  So this is a new wave album with six balls).  These balls don’t just lay around all day in a nut sac either.  No, way.  These balls like to get down, jump around, fuck shit and just have a riotously good time in general.  So yah, new wave, you’ll like this album if you like Blondie (fronted by Jay Reatard) or the B-52’s (fronted by Andy Falkous).1 


1  Editor’s Note:  if Paul is saying Cheap Time are like a cross between Blondie and Jay Reatard or the B-52’s and Mclusky, he is full of shit.  Nothing is that good.

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