Tag Archives: Propagandhi

Top 100 Albums of 2000 (80-61)

80.  OOIOO – Gold and Green

Yoshimi P-We (of the Boredoms) drops much of the grating no wave and goes for melody and atmosphere (kind of like her main band’s album from the same year in fact).  – Willie Rambo Strider

79.  Broadcast – The Noise Made by People

I have always heard Stereolab too much in Broadcast’s music to get too into it.  Which isn’t fair to them, cos it is pretty darn good electronic Euro-pop made for old spy movies.  Contains some fantastic songs and would rank much higher if I could ever get over how much it sounds like a Stereolab rip-off.  — Songssuck

78. White Stripes – De Stijl

I hadn’t listened to this in at least 5 years.  It just never made me as hard as everyone else.  But I am glad I dug it out, I was surprised by how much I enjoyed it.  Pretty diverse set of songs for a rock duo.  If you liked Elephant pick this up, I always thought this was a better album.  – Ho Chi Unser Jr.

77. Boris – Flood

Like Absolutego, this album is one long track (I know that turned a few off already).  Boris at their most minimalist and serene.  Jimi Hendrix joining a krautrock band and trying to seduce a woman by sending gentle ocean guitar waves her way would sound like this.  But at times one feels as if the waves are a flood of heaviness, albeit not heaviness from loudness, riffs or death metal vocals.  Leave it to Boris to be so good they can be heavy without being heavy.  — Pthestudp

76. Deftones – White Pony*

Deftones: here to show us that rap + metal or nu-metal wasn’t such a bad idea after all.  — Pthestudp

75. Super Furry Animals – Mwng

A largely acoustic offering, void of the electronic studio wizardry and harder rocking songs and sung entirely in Welsh.  Interestingly enough, as this was my first SFAs, I thought they were all like this.  And that’s not a bad thing, even though their organic arrangements and acoustic instrumentation don’t allow the band to really flesh the songs out like on other SFA albums.  I guess the band didn’t put too much time or money into the album (this along with the other aforementioned differences made some critics and fans dismiss this album as a stunt), but that doesn’t keep it from being a really great pop album that you will sing along with, even if it is in Welsh (actually the language barrier for me makes this album more otherworldly and lush and just plain better, I can’t really explain it.  It is just a beautiful language).  Get a version with the 5 bonus tracks, they are good.  – Dr. Anonymous

74. Wu-Tang Clan – The W

Depending on what day it is, I like this even better than Supreme Clientele (although not most days). It makes me sad when I talk to people about 36 Chambers and they haven’t heard this one.  – Dr. Anonymous

73.  Primal Scream – XTRMNTR

Bobby Gillespie recruits Mani (from the Stone Roses, which was an excellent choice, as some of the basslines are just incredible) and Kevin Shields (of My Bloody Valentine) and an army of robot insects for his percussion section.  The first two songs on the album, “Kill All Hippies” and “Accelerator” vie for the top songs of 2000.  But one cannot start off an album so strong and expect people not to be disappointed as it goes along.  If this list was the best two songs to start off an album, XTRMNTR would win hands down.  – Kid Kilowatt

72.  Mirah – You Think It’s Like This But Really It’s Like This*

I’ve read a lot of myths about Mirah.  That she makes nut milk and sells it at the café she runs out of her apartment, that she was born on her parents’ kitchen table, that her full name is Mirah Yom Tov Zeitlyn, and that she is a gay Jewish hobo hippie.  Who knows which, if any, are true.  Her debut album has been called “brutally cloying” and a “charmer.”  Honestly, I find both to be true depending on one’s mood and which of the 16 songs one is listening to.  The discerning folks at aQ records point out that Mirah could have just as easily done the soundtrack to Juno.  That goes a long way towards describing her music, but it is nowhere as apt of a description as on YTILTBRILT.  You can literally hear some of the songs on the movie, they are honest, endearing and heart wrenching.  Phil Elverum of the Microphones (which Mirah was also a member of) lends his production and instrumental skills to the album, and his presence is palpable.  – Suzy Creamcheese

71.  Arab on the Radar – Soak the Saddle

Yoko Ono fronting the teenage noise punk band next door.  Obviously, for some, or in certain moods this album will be too abrasive/annoying.  But I cannot say ‘No’ to the guitars (although Pitchfork can, they gave it a ‘2.0’). – Songssuck

70.  Marumari – The Wolves Hollow

Supposedly, this album tells the story of a wolf race from outer space.  The wolfemian fed cow brains to a supercomputer in order to survive.  But on April 18th, 1976, the war of the worlds began when earth wolves attacked the wolfemian.  Before the alien wolves were all destroyed, thy passed their music onto Josh Presseisen, who had contacted the wolfemian some years earlier on ham radio.  This all sounds really lame and ridiculous, until one has listened to the album about 3 times.  The Wolves Hollow rewards repeated listens and the otherworldliness of the music begins to shine through.  Then one realizes it could only have come from alien wolves.  – Kid Kilowatt

69.  Iron Maiden – Brave New World

Bruce Dickinson and Adrian Smith return to Maiden thus reuniting the classic lineup (along with 3rd guitarist Janick Gers) for the first time since 1990’s No Prayer for the Dying (I think, it might have even been 88’s Somewhere in Time).  Maiden sound rejuvenated and ready to kick ass again.  Seriously, if you like Maiden you owe it to yourself to pick this one up.  Not as good as their first five albums, but up there.  Brought down a bit by Harris’ overt progginess that doesn’t work at times, but how many 80’s metal bands still kicked this much ass in 2000?  None.  — Pthestudp

68.  Sacred Steel – Bloodlust

Ever been sad after thinking about the lack of classic metal being produced these days?  Well dry your tears heavy metal warriors.  Sacred Steel are here with 11 songs that sound like it is 1983.  – Pthestudp

67.  Swearing at Motorists – Number Seven Uptown

Dave Doughman and Don Thrasher (dude who drummed for GBV during their especially kick ass period) create some Guided By Voices influenced ditties about coming home for Christmas, vans, wondering where you went wrong, and seeing an ex girlfriend walking down the street.  I love their lo-fi harmonies.  An underrated album from a very unheard band.  – Kid Kilowatt

66. The For Carnation – s/t

Nick Mirov, who writes for the website the Bay Bridged had this to say: “This album is the sonic equivalent of standing on a deserted dock at midnight and watching fog roll towards you with a nagging feeling in your gut that some evil presence is near.”  I bought this album because of its connections with Slint and Tortoise (Brian Mc and Britt Walford from Slint and John McEntire from Tortoise).  Don’t be surprised if you are disappointed if you come to this album for the wrong reasons (it really isn’t much like Slint or Tortoise), as I was for a long time. – Songssuck

65. Boss Hog – Whiteout

Some swampy blues, with a lot of electronics thrown in for extra kicks, from Christina Martinez and her husband Jon Spencer.  Judge this book by its cover cos the music, like the cover is good shit.  – Willie Rambo Strider

64.  Propagandhi – Today’s Empires, Tomorrow’s Ashes*

John K. Samson left to form Weakerthans and took a lot of the melody & humor along with him.  Propagandhi were much more hardcore and pissed off on this album, “with friends like these, who the fuck needs Cointelpro?”  Definitely worth buying the actual album, a lot of info that blew my mind back then included.  Appropriate that it was one in the bunch that my mother threw away, that’s for sure (although I would like to think that Patti stands against “bullshit politicians,” the exploitation of workers in 3rd World countries, terrorism, and “ordinary people do[ing] fucked-up things when fucked-up things become ordinary.”)  She just really hates hardcore.  Don’t we all.  – Pthestudp

63.  Radiohead – Kid A*

I know I know.  You are tired of hearing/reading about Radiohead and Kid A. But you know what’s crazy?  There are some people who don’t listen to Radiohead.  Dumbasses.  I hadn’t listened to this in like 5 years (Who’s guiltier?).  But seriously, that kind of proves my point: it is overrated.  It has become more of an idea than an album (like a holy grail everyone just looks at and no one drinks from), topping everyone’s best of the 00’s lists.  A good (but not the best from the last 10 years) album that needs to be listened to and not talked about.  So I’ll shut up now.  – Dr. Anonymous

62.  Jackie-O Motherfucker – Fig. 5

Deep in the Psychedelic Forest live a tribe of dwarves.  But these aren’t the type of dwarves you may have heard of.  These dwarves like to party, get fucked up and jam.  In fact these dwarves’ drum circles are so groovy that Albert Ayler sometimes stops by to sit in on the circle, drop some shrooms, drink some dwarf beer and deconstruct and revise folk classics to the point they become avant-garde masterpieces (in fact “Amazing Grace” is pretty much unrecognizable).  Can you dig it?  — Songssuck

61. The Panoply Academy Corps of Engineers – Concentus

If it were not for a album put out by Dischord, Concentus would hold the best math rock album of 2000 title.  Nar Nar Nar/ Nar Nar Nar Nar/ Heeeeeeeyyyyyyyyy! – Songssuck

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Top 50 Songs of 2009 (26-50)

50. Dutchess and the Duke
“Scorpio”


The harmonizing voices on this song perfectly capture the heartbreak of the narrator. Despite being near his lover, he still feels miles apart. A few weeks ago I was playing this song in my classroom during journal time, and one of my students commented that it sounded like something from “Juno”. I agreed, although I don’t remember Moldy Peaches ever sounding this damn beautiful.

49. NOFX
“Best God in Show”

Despite releasing a couple lackluster albums in the past few years, NOFX still have a gift for catching you off-guard. On the surface, “Best God in Show” is a happy-hippy jam, but when you get past the joyful ska riff and cheery organ, NOFX is once again questioning religion in a way that is both humorous and thought-provoking.

48. M. Ward
“Never Had Nobody Like You”

Once you get past the use of a double negative in the title, you will find M. Ward has written another hum-able gem that would fit perfectly alongside other classics on “Transfiguration of Vincent”. It’s just too bad he had to let Budweiser throw it into a comercial about guys hi-fiving…who okays these things and deems them as funny?

47. Jay-Z
“DOA (Death to Auto-Tune)

Jay-Z is the godfather of the rap world. When the Hova says auto-tune is dead, you better take notice. Like a modern-day Biz Markie, Jay-Z howls “Na, na, na, na! Hey, hey, hey! Goodbye!” off-key throughout the song, along with the use of live instrumentation, ranging from a squealing saxophone to a sultry guitar line. While most of the rap world has become a caricature of their former selves, Jay-Z continues to sing his own song, even if it is out of tune.

46. Bon Iver
“Woods”

Wait just one second Jay-Z…like a musical zombie, Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon breathed new life into the auto-tuner with this captivating new approach to the played-out device. Somehow the old timey lyrics of “I’m building a still” work perfectly through the 21st century lens, sounding like a robotic barbershop quartet. And somehow, Vernon is still able to convey the loneliness and solitude of being alone in the woods.

45. Slayer
“Americon”

In a year where we got a glimpse of the stock market’s dirty under-belly and the corruption of American big business, it’s nice to see Slayer take a break from wreaking havoc on Christianity and focusing on the sick fucks who have preyed upon the middle class of this country for too long. There is something poetic about such an “evil” band taking on the true evil of this “land of deceit”.

44. Ty Segall
“Lovely One”

Ty Segall is often banging away at his guitar from start to finish, but on “Lovely One” he takes a break from his distortion pedal, starting off with a calming little guitar strum, eventually leading into the infectious chorus that would fit perfectly alongside The Animals and The Loving Spoonful on a classic oldies station.

43. Lightning Dust
“I Knew”

This song seems pressing despite the lack of a real drum track. The pulsing undertone continues from start to finish while the piano and organ truly take shape as percussion instruments, driving the two-minute romp through its existential path. How can something sound aged and cutting edge at the same time?

42. Pissed Jeans
“Goodbye (Hair)”

Historically, hardcore punk songs are about several defined topics: criticizing the government, criticizing the use of drugs/alcohol, or conveying how horrible it is to be a teenager. Pissed Jeans like to take a different stance. On past albums they’ve lamented the difficulties of being a stalker, the shame felt when cumming, and the perils of scrapbooking. On their 2009 release “King of Jeans” they even present the misery felt during the process of losing your hair:

I still can’t believe this is happening. I’m not fifty years old. I consider myself a young adult and want others to see me this way. If my looks deteriorate, it’ll wreak havoc on my self-esteem. Is that what I have to look forward to?

 Although humorous (and hitting a little close to home for a bald fella like myself) the song also conveys the anguish and frustration that is associated with growing old and losing your youth, one hair at a time.

41. Phoenix
“1901”

I know what you’re thinking: “How could he put this song so low on his list?!” Yes, I will admit that when I first heard this song during the spring, I played it endlessly. It’s catchy as hell and is even capable of getting a white boy like myself on his feet dancing (after a few beers mind you). Unfortunately, my love has turned to loathing due to the Cadillac ads played in heavy rotation during the commercial break of every football game. Despite this hatred, I still can’t deny what a great song it is, or was (don’t worry, Phoenix gets more cred on this list…)

40. The Love Language
“Lalita”

You’ve heard this song before, but in actuality you haven’t. Weird? That is the power of The Love Language my friends. Quit trying to remember where you heard it and just sit back and enjoy the tune you’ve never heard before but swear you have.

39. Morrissey
“Something’s Squeezing My Skull”

When Morrissey expresses that he is “doing fine”, you know he’s lying. Despite being an older gentleman, he still seems to be dealing with his demons, some of which take pleasure in squeezing his skull. Drugs? The perils of relationships? Insanity? Who cares really. At least musically Morrissey sounds better than ever, with a Gang of Four, angular riff and the closing chant of “Don’t give me anymore!” that you just can’t get enough of.

38. The Thermals
“Now We Can See”

The fact that you are hooked on this song within 10 seconds says it all.

37. Sonic Youth
“Thunderclaps for Pyn”

https://bobdylanwrotepropagandasongs.files.wordpress.com/2009/12/09-sonic_youth-thunderclap_for_bobby_pyn2.mp3

When I lived in Omaha I liked to go to the Old Country Buffet on barbeque night. I’d skip over the salad bar, the fried foods section, and even noodle salad row in search of one thing: BBQ ribs. I’d fill my plate with ribs, and ribs only. When all that remained was a plate with meat-less bones I’d go back for seconds, engulfing a pig’s entire rib cage by the end of my visit.  Sonic Youth’s “The Eternal” is much like a buffet line, featuring a wide range of Sonic sounds from over the years, ranging from the art noise of early days to the sparser atmospheres of recent albums. But, like a plate of short ribs, this past year I often found myself skipping over the other tunes in search of a nice earful of “Thunderclaps for Pyn”.  Yummy!

36. Lightning Bolt
“Sublime Freak”

How do you make a Lightning Bolt song more chaotic? Add bongos. But there is so much more going on in this song; there is actually a chorus! YES FOLKS! A CHORUS! And if you listen close enough, it almost sounds like a 1960s surfer tune. I can see the beach blanket gogo dancers now…

35. Japandroids
“The Boys are Leaving Town”

Sure, this song has sentimental value for me, reminding me of my road trip this past summer where Paul and I listened to this at the beginning of our trip and later saw the band perform in Boise, Idaho. But this song made its way on this list for more reasons than the memories associated with it. Simply put, it kicks ass. Being the anti-thesis to Cheap Trick’s “Boys are Back in Town”, Japandroids have taken the classic teenage angst of leaving town and given it a jolt with rolling, jumpy drum fills and passionate, lo-fi vocals.

34. Andrew Bird
“Fitz and the Dizzyspells”

Every interview/review I read about Andrew Bird’s 2009 release “Noble Beast” focused heavily on the album’s use of whistling. This is for good reason. Every song on the album features whistling at some point, an aspect that becomes annoying pretty quickly. Only on “Fitz and Dizzyspells” does Andrew find a happy medium between his violin and pierced lips, creating a joyful romp that begs you to put a smile on your face.

33. Yeah Yeah Yeahs
“Zero”

Karen O singing about leather? I’m sold.

32. Animal Collective
“Brother Sport”

In the past few years the tribal sounds of bands like MIA and El Guincho have become more and more popular.  How soon we forget that Animal Collective brought this sound to the forefront years ago.  On “Merriwether Post Pavillion” the boys finish the album off with “Brother Sport”, a tropical rumpus that works perfectly as a final track due to its celebratory tone. It also serves as a reminder that the Collective can still make you shake your ass off if they really want to.

31. Lou Barlow
“The One I Call”

I know, I know. I hate love songs too.  And I’ll admit, Lou Barlow’s “One I Call” would probably work great on a John Cusack chick flick.  But you can’t resist its earnest lyrics nor can you deny the comfort of the combination of Lou’s voice and his guitar. If I saw Lou on the street, I’d probably yell to him, “Great song Lou!” to which he’d glare at me in disgust (inside joke).

30. Blank Dogs
“Open/Shut”

Guided By Voices meets The Cure circa 1980s? Oh, what a sweet combination, like peanut butter and jelly.

29. Propagandhi
“Dear Coach’s Corner”

Propagandhi usually rage against racism, government, and of course the fact that “Meat is murder”.  But never before have I heard them write about such unique subjects as they do on “Supporting Caste”.  The best has to be “Dear Coach’s Corner”, a vial criticism of the Canadian hockey show “Coach’s Corner” (I guess with Bush out of office, their song material got cut in half). The ranting tune basically states an annoyance with announcers conveying their own agendas when in the end, it’s just a game. Shut the fuck up:

Dear Ron McLane, I wouldn’t bother with these questions
if I didn’t sense some spiritual connection.
We may not be the same, but it’s not like we’re from different planets.
We both love this game so much we can hardly fucking stand it. 

 There is something admirable in Propagandhi’s approach; no one is free from being criticized. Who wouldn’t like to hear a song ripping into Bill Walton, Bob Davie, or Joe Buck?

28. Jay Reatard
“Wounded”

Everything in this song has its function. The “lade-da-da” that starts the song leads into a sweet little acoustic guitar lick, jumping straight into Jay’s yelling anthem, and finally kicking into the fist pumping chorus. And then, when you think you’ve figured it all out, the song finishes off with a killer closer that would put “Hey Jude” to shame.  Jay Reatard is a master songwriter; it’s about time we all accept his God-liness.

27. Matt and Kim
“Good Ol’ Fashion Nightmare”

Matt and Kim songs are so simple. A plinking piano over a pounding drum beat and Matt’s nasally whine. Yet, with only these few elements they are able to write irresistable pop hits. While “Daylight” may be considered their breakout hit in 2009, “Good Ol Fashion Nightmare” is just as charming and replay-able.

26. Beirut
“My Night With the Prostitute From Marseille”

When I heard Beirut was releasing a double CD (one disc of them performing with a mexican mariachi band and another of Zach Condon singing over electronic music), I expected the first CD to be the better of the two but was disappointed by his Mexican offering.  Instead, I fell in love with the second disc of five dance songs, devoid of trumpets and accordians.  While two of the songs are about hookers, “My Night With the Prostitute From Marseille” is the obvious stand-out of the album.

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